Beoug Kok Lake

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Posted by: | Posted on: February 3, 2012

Cambodian authority and Decho must use the prowess of Dhamma or law, not the prowess of personality, to protect Cambodian citizens

Op-Ed: luonsovath.blogspot.com

It is a tragedy while the government and their leaders have been bragging on economic growth, national development, peace and prosperity after the dark cloud of civil war and brutality ended, many bottom-line people like the residents of Borei Keila have continuously been humiliated by such “development rhetoric”. Listen to the video clip below, a woman said “is this the development in the age of Decho?”. It is shameful for Decho to be heard like this. Hence, this plague has happened every where around the world, not only Cambodia, if the top leader is not having proper conduct and moral attitude in the Dhamma. Dhamma means rule of laws, not rule of personality. As our observation remarked, our Decho has always proliferated his personality to judge and decide all issues happening in Cambodian society.

Buddha has been known as an Enlightened personality, but Buddha has never claimed himself as the central personality in deciding and determining any controversial issues. Dhamma and Vinaya which have been well promulgated for public use is the guideline, the tool for proper decision making and substantial rule for every one regardless of their status, entity or tendencies etc. However, Cambodian Buddhists are sadden and sad when their top leader has been using personality to judge and make a decision with all things. Recent public talk of Decho about ordering his Ohna colleague to arrest the violators inside his company who shot innocent protesters in Kratie because of their curiosity on the land grab, is not right on the proper practice of the Dhamma or the rule of law. Decho must follow the rule of law, he couldn’t use his prowess to overlapped or undermine the existing law.

Cambodian law has solemnly condemned and punished those who committed violence and perpetrated illegal activities. Cambodian authority and Decho must use the prowess of the Dhamma/law, not the prowess of personality, in order to stop humiliating our own race and innocent Cambodian citizens.

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Posted by: | Posted on: October 5, 2011

Beoung Kok Lake, Urban Development and Poverty Reduction

“Cambodia’s 2001 Land Law prohibits deprivation of ownership without due process and grants the right to apply for a land title to someone who has been in possession of a private property for five years. Article 44 of the Constitution states that the government can only deprive someone of property for “public interest” purposes and requires the payment of fair and just compensation.

Land issue in Cambodia is lingering by the corruption and anarchic settlement. In the wake of war, for Cambodia, both government and people are anarchic. But the anarchic people is a large profit for anarchic government. The issue of Beoung Kok Lake once has been academically and publicly debated by the researchers, environmentalists, anthropologists and the government. The solution was settled to preserve this natural lake as the leisure place and water reservoir for flooding water in Phnom Penh capital city. But later, the government decided to give concession this important strategic land to their patron tycoon for 99 years without considering the research finding or having proper plan for it.

In a short period, government can hand that huge amount of money, but in a long run, the children of Phnom Penh city will be drawn and badly affected by this self-suicidal concession.

To duly understand Beoung Kok Lake and the urban poor/development, you should visit this website: http://saveboeungkak.wordpress.com Or if you need more academic point of view on the controversial development of Beoung Kok Lake, you should read Dr. Bunnarith’s paper; he gave us much insight on the proper development of Beoung Kok Lake http://www2.hawaii.edu/~csaloha

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