The Recommendations of Ta Meas

Today, it is my prestigious moment to have been reading a political, historical personal memos of Ta Meas during the political upheavals of Cambodia in the rival of Annam (Vietnam) and Siam (Thailand). Ta Meas in that time, according to his memos, he was 80 years old in the year of 1828. The book was recompiled and interpreted by Dr. Khing Hok Dy and in his preface, he described that Ta Meas had spent his life gone through at several Khmer monarchs such as Ang Chan, Queen Ang Mey, Ang Duong, Norodom and the beginning of Sisowath throne. Ta Meas’s narrative is simple, folktale style and reflective the destitute conditions of Cambodian people in that time because of internal divisions and outside invasions.

Dr.Khing Hoc Dy pointed out that this memo was published by French Protectorate with the first arrival of Printer Publishing in Khmer in 1907-1908 and the writing structure was slightly disorganized before the introduction of Cambodian first official dictionary in 1938. The significances of Ta Meas’s memo intrigued my thought to the disintegration of Cambodian nation and her territory integrity. Ta Meas was well aware of the distinction of Cambodian race upon the political interfering of Annam and Siam in that time. His brilliant point of view to seek other outside international partners to stabilize and neutralize Cambodia is fit well to the current survival of Cambodia.

There are many countries he mentioned in his memos that King sought to take their hand. Those countries including Europe, England, French, Portugal, Holland, Java, Sumatra, Singapore and Spain. His description is moving with the King’s international expanding to find supports and Cambodian King saw French as his important supporter to get rid of both Annam and Siam.

According to many academic researches of Post-Colonial countries and politics, there have numerous emerges of national identity, nations and nation states. Those are including new emerges of nation-states without linking to its past line and nation-states that has been strongly inherent to its glorious past. Cambodia has resurvived again in the continuity of Khmer race from Angkor era to present nation-state.

Penny Edwards, in her book “Cambodge: The Cultivation of a Nation 1860-1945″ fascinatingly articulates the regeneration of Cambodia to become a nation-state. Penny assumed the language, cultural, monumental and religious factors as the substantial premises leading to the formation of Cambodia. The compartmentalization in each of these factors was well prepared and built by French Protectorate. French has played important role in building a fragile Cambodia into a modern nation-state, Penny assumed.

I recommend every one to read The Memors of Ta Meas, it is really joyful reading book. And if you have time, please read Penny Edwards’s.

Orkun

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Cambodian politics slipping backwards

Cambodian politics slipping backwards

Written by Sophan Seng

Friday, 16 January 2009

Dear Editor,

Contemporary Cambodian politics has showcased its backwards development while the world is swiftly moving forward. The current Cambodian government has firmly maintained its grip on power while the main opposition parties, such as Funcinpec, have gradually disappeared, and Sam Rainsy’s party has slowly upgraded its strength to fully compete with the Cambodian People’s Party.

The imbalance of power and the lack of strong opposition will leave a greater distance in power and lead to the destruction of Cambodian democracy.
Continue reading “Cambodian politics slipping backwards”

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Things of connectiveness of nationalism

1. Identity

Individual/personal identity, collective identity, and national identity

2. Push factors, pull factors of immigrants

Historical push and pull factors, geographical push and pull factors, economic push and pull factors, political push and pull factors, social push and pull factors

3. Understanding of nation

Language, ethnicity, culture, religion, geography, relationship to land, spirituality, politics, shared value and beliefs

4. My loyalty to (contending nationalist loyalties?)

a person, a cause, an idea, a value, a nation, a community, myself

Religious Loyalty, Regional Loyalty, Ethnic Loyalty, Class Loyalty, Cultural Loyalty

5. Think…Participate…Research…Communicate, Recall…Reflect…Respond

6. Should nations pursue national interest?

National Interest and Foreign Policy (how do national interest and foreign policy shape each other?), Nationalism and Ultranationalism (how can nationalism lead to ultranationalism?), Ultranationalism and Crimes Against Humanity (how can ultranationalism lead to crimes against humanity?), National Self-Determination (should national self-determination be pursued?)

7. How does ultranationalism developed?

Countries in Crisis, Charismatic Leaders, Instilling Ultranationalist Values

8. Should internationalism be pursued?

Nations, Nation-States, and Internationalism: does involvement in international affairs benefit nations and states?

Foreign Policy and Internationalism: should foreign policy promote internationalism?

Internationalism and Nationalism: does promoting internationalism affect nationalism?

Internationalism and Global Issues: how effectively does internalism address contemporary global issues?

Key terms: needs, wants, isolationism, unilateralism, bilateralism, multilateralism, supranationalism

9. How internationalism benefit nations and nation-states?

peace and security, economic stability, self-determination, internationalism and humanitarianism,

10. How can nation-states promote internationalism through foreign policy?

promoting peace, peacekeeping and internationalism, international laws and agreements, foreign aid and internationalism

11. Global Challenges

poverty, hunger, disease, debt, climate change, human rights, conflict

Key terms: absolute poverty, odious debt, civil society

12. National Myths

Myths can also represent a nation’s identity. Many cultures are founded on a creation myth — a story that tells how a place, a city, or a nation and its people came into being. These myths provided ancient peoples with a foundation for their future and a reason for their laws and traditions. They also helped unify the members of the community.

Today, myths are still used to unify a people and to promote national identity. National myths are stories that promote national values and perspectives. They can include ancient myths, such as stories of the Greek gods of Mount Olympus, and ancient religious texts, such as the Hindu epic poem Ramayana. They can also include versions of historical events and personalities.

13. How can individuals promote a national identity?

musicians, painter, story tellers

Derived from Margaret Hoogeveen 2008. Understanding Nationalism. McGraw-Hill Ryerson Publishing. macgrawhill.ca

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Habits of Mind

Habits of Mind

Certain character traits — or habits of mind — promote critical thinking and effective decision making. Whether you are completing a social studies assignment or dealing with other challenges, these habits of mind can help you achieve success at school and in life.

What habits of mind or critical thinking you have pursued?

1. I’m an active thinker

I explore alternatives and consider their strengths and weekness

I persevere. The first — or most obvious — solution is not always the best.

I resist pressure to adopt opinions just because they are popular.

I think about how I’m thinking about an issue.

2. I am curious

I do not take everything at face value. I investigate beyond the obvious.

I take time to think about things and explore unanswered questions.

I look for various sources of information and expert opinions.

Continue reading “Habits of Mind”

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