William Todd

now browsing by tag

 
 
Posted by: | Posted on: August 24, 2015

‘Bored’ of Advice of the West, Hun Sen Praises His Own Leadership

‘Bored’ of Advice of the West, Hun Sen Praises His Own Leadership

Hun Sen said his policies have moved Cambodia from a “planned economy” to a free-market one after decades of civil war, making it an attractive place for investors.

Cambodia's Prime Minister Hun Sen gestures as he delivers a speech during his presiding over an inauguration ceremony for the official use of a friendship bridge between Cambodia and China at Takhmau, Kandal provincial town south of Phnom Penh, Cambodia, Monday, Aug. 3, 2015.

Cambodia’s Prime Minister Hun Sen gestures as he delivers a speech during his presiding over an inauguration ceremony for the official use of a friendship bridge between Cambodia and China at Takhmau, Kandal provincial town south of Phnom Penh, Cambodia, Monday, Aug. 3, 2015.

Hul ReaksmeyVOA Khmer
Prime Minister Hun Sen addressed a dinner of powerful businessmen Saturday night, claiming he could be a “professor” to Western leaders, who are beginning to bore him with their advice.

Hun Sen said his policies have moved Cambodia from a “planned economy” to a free-market one after decades of civil war, making it an attractive place for investors.

“I am really proud of the policies of the party, as well as my leadership, which has been responsible for the executive body for over 30 years,” Hun Sen told the attendant tycoons. “I understood clearly that you all would deposit your money abroad or would use your money to buy homes abroad, ignoring investments here.”

Instead, his policies have grown the wealthy class, increasing business activities, Hun Sen said. This has made him “bored” with advice from countries of the West, he said. That includes the outgoing US ambassador, William Todd.

U.S. Ambassador to Cambodia William E. Todd gives a speech during a repatriation ceremony to honor the recovery of possible remains believed to belong to missing U.S. military service members found in Kampong Cham province.

U.S. Ambassador to Cambodia William E. Todd gives a speech during a repatriation ceremony to honor the recovery of possible remains believed to belong to missing U.S. military service members found in Kampong Cham province.

“I met with the US ambassador before he left Cambodia,” Hun Sen said. “When he was talking with me, he talked a lot about change. I then said to him: ‘Don’t forget whom you are talking with. Your Excellency is truly talking with a professor who can teach you or the president of your country or other prime ministers on change.’”

“If I can’t discern change, or change the process, would I have been able to stay in power for more than 30 years?” Hun Sen said. “I’m bored with some of the advice provided by some countries to Cambodia.”

Read More …

Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
Posted by: | Posted on: June 17, 2015

Promoting Meaningful Reforms in Cambodia

Promoting Meaningful Reforms in Cambodia

Published: 14-Jun-15 09:24 AM

Give our kids a better deal

By: William E. Todd

The Montagnard refugee dilemma continued to make news this week, as many here in Cambodia and in the international community remain concerned about the status of those seeking asylum.  According to the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, there are currently more than one hundred Montagnards in Phnom Penh who are seeking to register for asylum.  The media also reports that a significant number of Montagnards now in Cambodia have not been registered or are not pursuing asylum due to concerns about due process and the rule of law, leaving them in legal limbo.  This situation provides Cambodia with an opportunity to demonstrate a responsive and rules-based process that provides a positive example for other countries.
This dilemma leads me to this week’s question, which is on the minds of many Cambodians:  “Which reforms do you think the National Assembly should focus on in the near term?”  This is a good question and one that many will debate.  In my opinion, the country would best be served by focusing on topics that benefit the average Cambodian.  Rather than making a new NGO law the top priority, which I believe is not needed, the National Assembly could consider addressing poverty, education, health care, and environmental protection.  However, improving the rule of law, which encompasses a broad range of topics that would ultimately benefit Cambodian citizens, is an area where both parties could work together.
Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •